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teaching history



  • How Textbooks Taught White Supremacy

    "I came across one textbook that declared on its first page, “This is the White Man’s History.” At that point, you had to be a dunce not to see what these books were teaching."



  • Overt Racism in the Street and Quieter Racism in the Curriculum

    by Alan J. Singer

    I don’t want to drop James Hammond’s speech to the United States Senate proclaiming “Cotton is King” from United States history textbooks and websites. But when the speech is cited, it should include an explanation who this man was, what he believed, and what he did.



  • Getting Creative With Course Assessments

    When navigating online education, faculty should stray away from traditional exams and opt for innovative assignments that will engage students rather than stress them out.


  • Suffragists' Work Didn't End in 1920

    by Mary Henold

    Women of color and their allies truly won the right to vote for all American women not in 1920, but in 1965, with the passage of the Voting Rights Act. 



  • Just for Fun, Games Historians Play

    by Randall Ballmer

    Counterfactual scenarios have a tremendous allure for historians at idle times, as does speculating about what historians will remember about the present. A noted historian of American religion has some thoughts on both topics. 



  • Epic Lego Battles Are A Smash On YouTube

    A subculture of Lego and military history enthusiasts has achieved notoriety for posting stop-motion videos of historic battles, despite the official non-violence policy of the building toy company. 



  • Remote Teaching Wiki

    Here, historians who have resources useful for remote teaching can share them, and those racing to adapt courses can search for materials instead of working from scratch.