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public history



  • Op-Ed | Confederate Memorials Serve A Role In National Parks

    by Harry Butowski

    "The removal of existing statues in our Civil War parks will not change our history, but make it more difficult to confront and examine our history. National parks are the great American classroom where American history is taught."



  • SPLC: Over 160 Confederate Symbols Were Removed in 2020

    "The nonprofit organization, based in Montgomery, Ala., started tracking symbols of the Confederacy after a white supremacist killed nine Black worshipers at a storied African-American church in Charleston, S.C., in 2015."



  • After the Riot, What’s the Future of Art in the Capitol?

    Art Historian Sarah Lewis suggests that damage to the artworks in the Capitol during the rioting presents an opportunity to rethink what subjects are included in a collection that signals inclusion in the national narrative. 



  • The Future Of Confederate Monuments

    by Kim O'Connell

    “The Park Service needs to ask, ‘Who’s coming to your site and who’s not coming to your site?’” says Denise Meringolo, a professor of public history at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. “Those monuments are a barrier to significant portions of the audience, for whom they are not simply inaccurate or annoying. They are traumatizing.”



  • A Paradox: History Without Historians

    by Jim Grossman

    "We cannot heal this nation without accurately understanding its pathologies, which are by their very nature historical."



  • Behind these Names, You’ll Find Stories of L.A.'S Black History

    The city of Los Angeles's early Anglo history was marked by the national conflict over slavery, and local decisions granting freedom to Black Angelenos shaped the city. Longtime LA Times columnist Patt Morrison discusses the public markers to African American history in the city. 



  • San Francisco’s Ridiculous Renaming Spree

    If those on the right were looking for an example to condemn the trend of renaming public facilities because of the misdeeds of prominent historical figures, they couldn't have asked for more than the slapdash actions of the San Francisco school board, writes journalist Gary Kamiya.