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military history


  • Can the COVID Crisis Create a New Civilian-Military Trust in Argentina?

    by David M. K. Sheinin y Cesar R. Torres

    Many Argentinians have been suspicious of military involvement in civil affairs since the end of the country's military dictatorship in 1983. Two scholars ask if the COVID crisis presents an opportunity for healing and reimagining the military's role in Argentina.


  • There is Nothing Sacred About the Military Vote

    by Rachel Gunter

    After a patient count, Joe Biden has claimed victory, and fears that late-arriving military absentee ballots could be subject to litigation that might decide the election have receded. This is fortunate, because history shows parties won't hesitate to interfere with the military vote for political advantage.



  • Overcoming Setbacks in Academic Freedom at West Point

    by Chris Arney

    "The West Point faculty model and its policies have been evolving since Congress mandated the inclusion of more civilian faculty members in the 1990s. However, the clash of ideals and teaching methods between the academic and military cultures still exists, sometimes resulting in civilian-military discord and disagreement over values and process."


  • A Star-Spangled Moment of Reckoning for U.S. Civil-Military Relations?

    by Gregory D. Foster

    The "deal" between the military and civilian leadership has hinged on an exchange of obedience to lawful authority by the military for expectations of honesty, competence, and respect for the Constitution on the part of elected leaders. This deal has been taken for granted, until now. 



  • Americans Aren't Worried about White Nationalism in the Military– Because They Don't Know It's There

    by Jennifer Spindel, Matt Motta, and Robert Ralston

    The extent of white nationalism in the active military is not precisely known. But few Americans are aware at all of the connections between the military and far right groups. Publicizing the fact that military leadership--a trusted group--is concerned about the issue could make more Americans aware of the problem of domestic extremism.



  • The Endless Fantasy of American Power

    by Andrew Bacevich

    Neither Trump nor Biden seems prepared to do the necessary work of moving military power and force from the center of American foreign policy. The consequence will be further endless war at the expense of the global-scale policies needed to confront the most urgent threats.


  • Breaking Lincoln's Promise

    by Shannon Bontrager

    Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg address demanded that Americans keep the memory of both the Union dead and their cause alive and "hot." The cooling of that memory has enabled backlashes against justice through history, and today. 



  • Trump’s Doubts about the Military have Deep Roots in Both Parties

    by Michael Kazin

    Recent media discussions of Trump's remarks about war veterans and indifference to visiting a World War I memorial should prompt deeper thought about the antiwar movements of the right and left that the Great War created. Opposition to war can be rooted in very different values and advance different ends.


  • The Pentagon is Missing the Big Picture on "Stars and Stripes"

    by Mark T. Hauser

    The Pentagon's plan to scrap funding for the Stars and Stripes newspaper isn't just an attack on a historic military institution. It's ignoring the lessons the paper's history offers for efficient operation and integrating military operations with the economic life of the nation. 



  • In 2020, Eisenhower is a Lantern in the Dark

    by Derek Chollet

    The opening of a monument to Ike in Washington is occasion to remember his commitment to the idea that American national strength depended on internal harmony and justice.