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military history



  • African-American Sacrifice in the Killing Fields of France

    For their bravery in capturing Séchault from the Germans on Sept. 29, 1918, and for other combat action, the regiment known as the "Harlem Hellfighters" was awarded France’s highest military honor, the Croix de Guerre, soon after the war. 



  • New Documentary: Tuskegee Airmen: Legacy of Courage

    TV journalist Robin Roberts produces a documentary on the famed Tuskegee Airmen – including her father – whose service in World War II supported the long movement for civil rights. 



  • A Southerner who abandoned the Lost Cause (Review)

    West Point historian Ty Seidule's book traces his own personal path from venerating the Lost Cause myth of the Confederacy to rejecting it, including questioning the number of monuments to Robert E. Lee at the US Military Academy. 



  • America’s First Black Regiment Earned Their Freedom by Fighting Against the British

    Philip Morgan says the decision to enlist both free and enslaved Black troops resulted both from Rhode Island's difficulty mustering a sufficient all-white force and George Washington's fear that Lord Dunmore's offer of freedom to enslaved men who joined the British army would undermine the slavery-based economy of Virginia and the southern colonies. 



  • History Exposes the Problem with Biden’s Defense Secretary Nominee

    by Grant Golub

    World War II demonstrated the need for strong civilian control over a military divided between multiple armed service branches, both to guide strategy and to ensure the ultimate authority of the President over the military. The nomination of a recently-retired Army general for Secretary of Defense departs from that tradition. 



  • Musing on Gender Integration in the Military with Simone de Beauvoir

    by Bill Bray

    For those engaged in the military gender integration debate today, de Beauvoir’s writing offers an additional reminder — those arguing against more integration may be no less intelligent and sincere than those championing change. But they still may be wrong.


  • Can the COVID Crisis Create a New Civilian-Military Trust in Argentina?

    by David M. K. Sheinin y Cesar R. Torres

    Many Argentinians have been suspicious of military involvement in civil affairs since the end of the country's military dictatorship in 1983. Two scholars ask if the COVID crisis presents an opportunity for healing and reimagining the military's role in Argentina.


  • There is Nothing Sacred About the Military Vote

    by Rachel Gunter

    After a patient count, Joe Biden has claimed victory, and fears that late-arriving military absentee ballots could be subject to litigation that might decide the election have receded. This is fortunate, because history shows parties won't hesitate to interfere with the military vote for political advantage.