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suffrage



  • Patsy Takemoto Mink Blazed The Trail For Kamala Harris – Not Susan B. Anthony

    by Judy Tzu-Chun Wu

    Patsy Takemoto Mink, elected in 1972 as the first woman of color in Congress, deserves recognition as a pioneering advocate for gender equity and the rights of Americans Caribbean and Pacific territories, and for preparing a path for Kamala Harris's election as Vice President. 



  • Suffrage: Women's Long Battle for the Vote (Virtual Event, 10/26)

    Speaker Ellen DuBois will be joined by panelists Kimberly A. Hamlin and Marcia Chatelain to discuss the history of Woman Suffrage for the Washington History Seminar, hosted by the Woodrow Wilson Center and the National History Center. 



  • Women Would Abolish Child Labor (and Other Anti-Suffrage Excuses)

    A host of reactionary forces let by southern segregationists and big businesses mounted a last-ditch campaign to thwart the Nineteenth Amendment, raising false accusations of bribery and corruption against state officials who supported the amendment. When that failed, they took their case all the way to the Supreme Court, to no avail. 


  • Suffragists' Work Didn't End in 1920

    by Mary Henold

    Women of color and their allies truly won the right to vote for all American women not in 1920, but in 1965, with the passage of the Voting Rights Act. 



  • The Improbable Journey of the Suffragist Sash

    by Hilary Levey Friedman

    The sash embodies the suffragists’ vision of womanhood — one that was simultaneously progressive and regressive.  That vision helped move women into the public and political spheres, but it did so by emphasizing their appearance. 



  • Women, Voting, and the Nineteenth Amendment: A JAH Suffrage Reader

    To mark the centennial of the Nineteenth Amendment, and to encourage critical assessment of the broader histories of suffrage and suffrage restriction in the United States, the Journal of American History has assembled “Women, Voting, and the Nineteenth Amendment: A JAH Suffrage Reader.”