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North Carolina



  • The Campaign to Free the Wilmington 10 Holds the Key to Successful Activism Today

    by Kenneth Janken

    A campaign to free 10 racial justice protesters in 1972 worked because it connected the cause to the problems with police, poverty, and racism experienced by a broad cross section of the community, and "recognize[d] racism not as separate from history but as part of historical processes and political economy."



  • The Plan to Build a Capital for Black Capitalism

    Thomas Healy's book "Soul City" looks at a short-lived experiment to create a capital city for Black capitalism in America, part of a long series of political debates about whether the pursuit of economic power by Black Americans would overcome racism. 



  • What Was the Dixie Highway, Anyway?

    Historian Tammy Ingram discusses the Dixie Highway, about which she wrote the book, as a rare project of early 20th-century highway building and tourism development that was completed. 



  • Even if Georgia Turns Blue, North Carolina may not Follow

    by Michael Bitzer and Virginia Summey

    North Carolina's politics have long been characterized by a competition between fairly evenly balanced forces of conservatism and moderation. Democrats who hope to permanently tip the state in their favor are likely to be disappointed. 



  • An American Pogrom (Review)

    by David W. Blight

    David W. Blight reviews a new book on the 1898 Wilmington massacre and the violent overthrow of multiracial democracy in North Carolina. 



  • Somebody Died, Babe: A Musical Coverup of Racism, Violence & Greed

    by Kevin Kehrberg & Jeffrey A. Keith

    The song "Swannanoa Tunnel" has been changed through generations of recordings by white musicians, concealing its origins as a song sung by Black convict-lease laborers who were forced to work in deadly conditions, often as punishment for minor crimes (or no crimes at all).