;

World War 2



  • No More Lies. My Grandfather Was a Nazi

    "Suddenly, I no longer had any idea who my grandfather was, what Lithuania was, and how my own story fit in. How could I reconcile two realities? Was Jonas Noreika a monster who slaughtered thousands of Jews or a hero who fought to save his country from the Communists?" writes Silvia Foti. 


  • Seven Years from the "Day of Infamy" to "Human Rights Day"

    by Rick Halperin

    "As 2020 comes to a close, even in the midst of a terrible pandemic which may claim 300,000 U.S. deaths by year’s end,  we would do well to pause and reflect upon how much progress has been made, and still needs to be made, in the struggle for human rights."



  • Europe’s Most Terrible Years

    World War II was bookended by the infliction of mass suffering on Poles at the war's beginning and on German civilians at the war's end, with the worst years of Europe's history in between. 


  • Recognizing an Unrecognized Chinese American WWII Veteran

    by A.J. Wong

    In December, Congress honored all Chinese American World War II veterans with the Congressional Gold Medal, and some of their families will be eligible to receive a replica medal in their names. Hoy You Lim (林開祐) was killed in action in France in 1944. None of his survivors could complete the paperwork to receive his medal. The granddaughter of another Chinese American veteran wants to recognize his service. 


  • Is There Anything Left to Learn about Hitler?

    by James Thornton Harris

    Volker Ullrich presents a picture of a leader whose "egocentrism... inability to self-criticize…tendency to overestimate himself... contempt for others and lack of empathy" made him willing to destroy his nation along with himself, but warns that the Third Reich was "a dictatorship of consent." 



  • What The Hitler Conspiracies Mean

    by Richard J. Evans

    Against evidence and common sense, theories persist that Adolf Hitler escaped Berlin to live in Argentina. An expert on the memory of the Third Reich argues that the conspiracy theories reflect a broad rejection of expertise and show the need for historians to engage the public. 



  • How the World Gave Up on the Stateless (Review)

    Over 10 million people are stateless today, and governments seem hell-bent on increasing their numbers. A new book examines how the rise of modern states created the dire circumstance of statelessness.