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book reviews



  • When Democracy Ails, Magic Thrives

    by Samuel Clowes-Huneke

    A new book by historian Monica Black suggests that the irrational was never absent from the postwar order—and, moreover, that florid eruptions of mystical thinking often accompany periods of extreme political upheaval. 



  • Present Absences: A Century of Struggle in Palestine (Review)

    For Khalidi, the British mandate established two parallel realities in Palestine: an embryonic nation-building project for the Jewish minority and the continuation of colonial policy for the Arab majority, whose question of self-determination was left unaddressed.



  • A Master Historian at Work

    by George H. Nash

    The award-winning historian's reflections on the writing and teaching of history offer a master class in the scholar's art. 



  • A New Kind of Bondage

    by Jason S. Sexton

    TONY PLATT’S Beyond These Walls provides a relentless critique of the United States’s carceral regime, prompting us to rethink how criminal justice institutions operate.


  • The Original War on Terror

    by Eric Laursen

    A review of Nunzio Pernicone and Fraser M. Ottanelli, Assassins against the Old Order: Italian Anarchist Violence in Fin de Siècle Europe.