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multiculturalism



  • Liberals Envisioned a Multiracial Coalition. Voters of Color Had Other Ideas

    Since the dawn of the 21st century, it has become commonplace for party leaders to talk of a rising demographic tide that is destined to lift the Democrats to dominance. The party should look at the defeat of California's affirmative action referendum as a caution that things won't be so simple. 



  • Is It Time for All Students to Take Ethnic Studies?

    The position of ethnic studies in university curricula reflects changing intellectual currents but also longstanding battles over resources and power in higher education institutions. 



  • Ethnic Studies Can't Make Up for Whitewashed History in Classrooms

    by Jonathan Zimmerman

    "American history is ethnic studies. You simply can’t understand the United States without addressing its component races, ethnicities and religions. Sadly, the recent drive for ethnic studies demonstrates just how far we are from that ideal."



  • Higher Ed’s Shameful Silence on Diversity

    by Hasan Kwame Jeffries

    Right-wing diatribes about diversity training often ended with a call for Trump to issue an executive order banning federal agencies from holding them. So it was not unexpected when, on September 22, Trump signed an executive order forbidding diversity training within the government.



  • Princeton, Betsy DeVos, And The Need For a Real Debate About Race

    by Jonathan Zimmerman

    Although the Department of Education investigation of Princeton is likely in bad faith, Jonathan Zimmerman contends that Princeton's self-flagellation about its institutional racism reflects a rising orthodoxy, not a deep debate about how the university operates.



  • The Wages of Whiteness (Review Essay)

    Hari Kunzru's review essay examines the current vogue for white antiracism (and antiracist training) through the history of whiteness as a political and academic concept, concluding that many  of the most popular books and multicultural pieties strip the idea of its structural elements and reduce it to a question of personal purification. 


  • The Hate-Mongers: Characterizing Racism in Comics

    by Patrick L. Hamilton and Allan W. Austin

    The Hate-Monger, a supervillain introduced by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby in 1963, called attention to the destructive power of bigotry, but today readers should resist the idea that defeating any one person, no matter who or how powerful they might be, can eliminate racism. 


  • "Western Civ" Was Not a Late Invention

    by Stanley Kurtz

    America’s colleges taught Western civilization for centuries before the curricular disruptions of the 1960s, and the topic’s appeal was trans-partisan.


  • DC Comics and the American Dilemma of Race

    by Patrick L. Hamilton and Allan W. Austin

    Superhero popular culture has always been embedded within American racial attitudes, reflecting and even contributing to them in ways that reveal goodwill is not sufficient, in and of itself, to fix our problems.