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Civil War



  • Op-Ed | Confederate Memorials Serve A Role In National Parks

    by Harry Butowski

    "The removal of existing statues in our Civil War parks will not change our history, but make it more difficult to confront and examine our history. National parks are the great American classroom where American history is taught."



  • The Future Of Confederate Monuments

    by Kim O'Connell

    “The Park Service needs to ask, ‘Who’s coming to your site and who’s not coming to your site?’” says Denise Meringolo, a professor of public history at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. “Those monuments are a barrier to significant portions of the audience, for whom they are not simply inaccurate or annoying. They are traumatizing.”



  • The Current Republic of Suffering

    by Murray Browne

    Drew Gilpin Faust's "This Republic of Suffering" inspires reflection on how the collective experiences of COVID and the loss of a half million Americans may shape the society that emerges. 



  • The Real Story of the ‘Draft Riots’

    by Elizabeth Mitchell

    "The story of the merchants’ response to the so-called Draft Riots is a reminder that we can all do more if we don’t want the lives of more Black people to be marred by cruelty."



  • Do We Really Need Another Biography of Robert E. Lee?

    by Kevin M. Levin

    Recent discussion of the forthcoming biography of Robert E. Lee by Allen Guelzo shouldn't foreclose the possibility that the book will offer insight because many historians object to Guelzo's participation in Donald Trump's conference on teaching history. 



  • Henry Wirz and Andersonville Prison

    Henry Wirz, commander of the infamous Confederate prison at Andersonville, Georgia, was hanged on November 10, 1865, in Washington, D.C., the only Confederate officer executed as a war criminal.



  • This is the Biggest Election in 160 Years

    by Manisha Sinha

    "The one underlying commonality that binds these two historic presidential elections is the conviction that it is American democracy -- rather than just opposing presidential candidates -- that is on the ballot."



  • How Democrats Can Learn Hardball From the Republicans of 1861

    The Antebellum slave power suppressed democracy and abolitionism through control of the institutions of American government, from the Senate to the courts to the postal service. Only after secession and the start of civil war did the Republican Party fight back successfully with hardball tactics.



  • #WEWANTMOREHISTORY

    by Greg Downs, Hilary N. Green, Scott Hancock, and Kate Masur

    At historic sites across the United States on September 26, dozens of participating historians presented evidence to disrupt, correct, or fill out the oversimplified and problematic messages too often communicated by the nation’s memorial landscape.



  • The Oligarchs’ Revenge (Review)

    by Manisha Sinha

    Heather Cox Richardson's book makes an essential argument that the conceptual distinction between class and race in American history obscures the way that American elites have worked to create and defend oligarchy. 



  • Holding an Election During the Civil War Set the Standard for Us Today

    by Jonathan W. White

    “We can not have free government without elections,” Lincoln told the crowd, “and if the rebellion could force us to forego, or postpone a national election, it might fairly claim to have already conquered and ruined us.”