;

books



  • The Cuban Missile Crisis: Once More Unto the Breach

    by Sheldon M. Stern

    As the anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis approaches, longtime JFK Library historian Sheldon Stern reviews Theodore Voorhees Jr.'s new book, which argues that Kennedy and Kruschev each assumed personal control of negotiations in a way that rendered threats of war from hawkish subordinates all bark and no bite.



  • Eleanor Roosevelt, First Among First Ladies

    David Michaelis's new biography is an excellent resource for those unfamiliar with the life and work of Eleanor Roosevelt and her political partnership with FDR.



  • How the Welfare State Became the Neoliberal Order (Review)

    by Pablo Pryluka

    Although the Tennessee Valley Authority was a pioneering public works project, its alumni worked in Latin America to advance redevelopment projects that elevated the authority of big business, a model now associated with the neoliberal turn in the developed world. 



  • Why We Keep Reinventing Abraham Lincoln

    Adam Gopnik considers new books about Lincoln by David S. Reynolds and Sidney Blumenthal that address the personality and governing of the 16th president. 



  • How Jimi Hendrix’s London Years Changed Music

    A new book, at the 50th anniversary of the guitar master's death, takes Jimi Hendrix's leap from chitlin circuit sideman to London sensation as a turning point for rock music. 



  • ‘JFK,’ by Fredrik Logevall: An Excerpt

    Read an excerpt from Fredrik Logevall's new biography of John F. Kennedy touching on the collegiate Kennedy's observations of Europe as World War II began.



  • A New Theory of Western Civilization (Review)

    "The WEIRDest People in the World" is the latest addition to the Big History category. The outstanding feature of the genre is that it wrangles all of human existence into a volume or two, starting with the first hominids to rise up on their hind legs and concluding with us, cyborg-ish occupants of a networked globe.