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books


  • Book Review: Jeremy Black's Imperial Legacies

    by Jeff Roquen

    While Black lapses into a biased apologia and generalizes at the expense of factual evidence, Imperial Legacies, on the whole, delivers a long overdue re-contextualization of the British Empire.



  • Widow, slaveholder, mother of our first president

    by Marjoleine Kars

    Eager to uncover the real Mary, Martha Saxton, an emerita historian at Amherst College who has written biographies of Louisa May Alcott and Jayne Mansfield, set out to paint a more true-to-life portrait.



  • The Literary Battle of the Sexes, 1907-Style

    Of the 28 most popular books published between 1895 and 1902, 25 were by men. By 1904, though, the situation had begun to improve — and 1907 was a record-breaking year for women’s book sales.



  • ‘The Code’ Review: How Green Was the Valley

    by Randall Stross

    As late as the early 1970s, Northern California seemed a long-shot candidate for the center of the computerized universe. A review of Margaret O’Mara's The Code. 



  • Her Book in Limbo, Naomi Wolf Fights Back

    After her American publisher delayed her new book, “Outrages,” over accuracy concerns, she is responding with a strategy mixing scholarly peer review and damage control.


  • A Fresh Take on Watergate Illuminates the Present

    by James Thornton Harris

    While Richard Nixon’s rise and fall has been repeatedly examined — there are more than a dozen biographies of him — John Farrell’s book, Richard Nixon, a Life, offers many new insights.



  • Three Recent Books Examine Frederick Douglass' Legacy

    by Allis Radosh

    Frederick Douglass: America’s Prophet by D.H. Dilbeck, Frederick Douglass: Self-Made Man by Timothy Sandefur, and Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom by David W. Blight all offer a different interpretation of Douglass.