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historic preservation



  • University Finds 18th-Century Schoolhouse Where Black Children Learned to Read

    The discovery of a 260-year-old structure with such a deep connection to a little-known chapter of the history of Colonial Williamsburg, when the population was more than 50 percent Black and teaching slaves to read was legal, is especially significant, said history professor Jody Lynn Allen. 



  • The Rise and Fall of America's Lesbian Bars

    Even before COVID-19 a combination of factors have made lesbian bars much less common than their counterparts catering to gay men. Two filmmakers are working to raise funds to keep these establishments in business. This article also explains how bars became safe gathering places as cities passed "vice" laws that subjected lesbians to police harassment in public.



  • When an Enemy’s Cultural Heritage Becomes One’s Own

    As the conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan in the contested Nagorno-Karabakh region enters a cease-fire, what are the prospects for protecting sites of cultural and historical significance from destruction as acts of reprisal? History suggests it's possible, though difficult.



  • The Struggle to Document COVID-19 for Future Generations

    by Pamela Ballinger

    Images of suffering have been powerful spurs to humanitarian action in history, but the process has the potential to reinforce messages of fault, blame, and separation. Assembling a visual archive of the age of COVID must avoid those traps to be useful in the future. 



  • Will Trump Burn the Evidence?

    by Jill Lepore

    Reckoning with the Trump adminstration's actions and assigning moral or criminal sanction to any misdeeds will probably be compromised by the destruction or failure to maintain presidential records. 



  • Hinchliffe Stadium’s Comeback is a Home Run

    For Black Americans, the amphitheater-style stadium was home to and embodied the incredible spirit of Negro Leagues baseball. It will now be renovated so its story can be preserved.



  • History and Gentrification Clash in a Gilded Age Resort

    A proposal to redevelop a section of Newport, Rhode Island far from the city's typical tourist destinations has generated an unlikely alliance of low-income residents who fear displacement and affluent historic preservation advocates.