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  • Originally published 05/17/2013

    Kansas official stands by use of 'N-word'

    Kansas State Board of Education member Steve Roberts came under fire Tuesday for using the “N-word” at last month’s board meeting.Roberts, R-Overland Park, who used the word during a discussion of African-American history, stood by his choice of words “100 percent.”But board member Carolyn Campbell, D-Topeka, along with two members of the NAACP, called Roberts’ comments offensive.Roberts said the word on April 16 in the context of a vote on history standards....

  • Originally published 05/09/2013

    History changes course in Pacific

    PRE-EUROPEAN history could be taught at some Pacific universities for the first time ever if plans devised by local history academics come to pass.The collaboration between academics led by Max Quanchi and Morgan Tuimaleali’ifano aims to produce a Pacific-wide undergraduate history course to be taught at universities from Papua New Guinea to New Caledonia, Samoa and French Polynesia....

  • Originally published 04/07/2013

    Gilder Lehrman's Flawed History of Emancipation

    Image via Shutterstock.Publishers and curriculum developers are racing to align social studies lessons with new national Common Core literacy standards. Most are clearly motivated by financial incentives -- they want to sell textbooks, workshops, and online packages to school districts anxious to comply with new demands.

  • Originally published 01/16/2013

    What are the 10 Most Important Documents in American History?

    Announcing the winners in the reader poll "What are the 10 Most Important Documents in American History?" Nearly 800 readers voted -- the most important document in American history is the Marshall Plan!*Note: The Constitution, Declaration of Independence, and Bill of Rights were specifically EXCLUDED from the poll, since they'd be in the top three practically by default. We wanted to give other documents a chance!

  • Originally published 01/14/2013

    We All Politicize History

    American flags on the National Mall. Credit: Wiki Commons.Here’s an interesting question for historians: Why do ideologues never seem to be aware of their own ideology?Such is the case with the recent report from the Texas Association of Scholars and the National Association of Scholars’ Center for the Study of the Curriculum, “Recasting History: Are Race, Class, and Gender Dominating American History?”The groups’ answer to the title’s question is “yes,” which is hardly surprising given the NAS’s longstanding critique of scholars who raise questions about the mythology of American greatness.