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Jewish history



  • Jewish Refugee Scholars at Black Colleges

    The work of European Jewish academics at Historically Black Colleges in the United States is an underrecognized part of both Black and Jewish American history; many prominent African Americans were students of refugee professors. 



  • Georgia’s New Senators will Write the Next Chapter in Black-Jewish Relations

    by Jeff Melnick

    The history of the Leo Frank trial and lynching shows that, while both groups have faced prejudice and discrimination, "the glory of Black-Jewish relations has always been more aspirational than achieved." Georgia's two new senators have a chance to advance a coalition for progress and equity.



  • Dozens Of Academics Oppose New Controversial Yad Vashem Chair

    Holocaust historian Deborah Lipstadt is among the academics criticizing the appointment of a right-wing politician to head the Israeli Holocaust memorial and educational center, arguing that his remarks toward Palestinians and Arab Israelis are disqualifying. 



  • How the World Gave Up on the Stateless (Review)

    Over 10 million people are stateless today, and governments seem hell-bent on increasing their numbers. A new book examines how the rise of modern states created the dire circumstance of statelessness. 



  • Searching for Refuge After the Second World War

    New books by David Nasaw and Paul Betts examine the uncertain fate of Jewish Holocaust survivors in postwar Europe, the problem of massive human displacement, and the tension between interpreting Europe's refugee problem in universal terms or focusing on the specific consequences of anti-Jewish policies and prejudice. 


  • Fraught Family Reunification After the Holocaust

    by Rebecca Clifford

    "A tenth of Europe's pre-war population of Jewish children survived the Holocaust. Many sought and achieved reunification with their families, but reunification did not usually end the trauma endured by this "fragment of an entire generation."



  • Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Abraham Lincoln, and American Jewish History

    by Rebecca Brenner Graham

    Public mourning for Ruth Bader Ginsburg as a prominent Jewish American evokes Abraham Lincoln's role in supporting Jews in Civil War service, and the Jewish community's mourning after his assassination.



  • RBG, Historian: Why Justice Requires Memory

    by Chris Gehrz

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg's sense of justice was informed by a clear view of the path of American history and the knowledge that change toward equality was neither automatic nor unidirectional.