Join our mailing list

* indicates required

Tags Matching:

historical associations


  • Originally published 06/06/2013

    Mormon History Association stays close to roots

    For the past 48 years, the Mormon History Association has opened its doors to welcome historians and enthusiasts alike. All are welcome as long as they hold one thing in common: An interest in Mormon history.Mormon history lovers will gather for the 48th annual MHA conference June 6-9 in Layton, Utah.Though the group today can boast of a membership of approximately 1,100, with members from Hong Kong to St. George, the Salt Lake-based Mormon History Association came from humble beginnings....

  • Originally published 04/12/2013

    Turnout Middling at OAH Meeting in San Francisco

    FROM SAN FRANCISCO -- San Francisco. Steep hills, charming cable cars, rolling breezes off the ocean, and people so friendly, strolling through Golden Gate Park at 9:00am on a Thursday morning will net an amiable young visitor in a tweed jacket no less than two offers for high-quality drugs.

  • Originally published 03/29/2013

    AHA protests Senate initiative to restrict political science research funding

    On March 20, 2013, the United States Senate approved an amendment offered by Senator Tom Coburn (R-OK) to the Continuing Appropriations Act of 2013, which would restrict the use of federal funds in the National Science Foundation’s Political Science Program. In response, the Council of the American Historical Association approved the following statement of concern:The American Historical Association vigorously opposes the recent Senate appropriations amendment restricting National Science Foundation funding for research in political science to specific topics. The amendment, which requires the agency to limit funding to projects which it can certify “as promoting national security or the economic interests of the United States,” is wrong-headed in many ways.First, the amendment represents an intrusion by politicians into the well-established and generally successful peer-review process by which the agency reviews grant applications. Peer review ensures that grant decisions are made by individuals with the necessary expertise through a  reliable, widely accepted, process which minimizes bias. Imposing even innocuous-sounding political criteria for research compromises the autonomy that is necessary for intellectual progress—the first responsibility of the National Science Foundation.

History News Network