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obituaries



  • The Bravery of William Winter

    by Stuart Stevens

    Former Mississippi Governor William Winter should be remembered for facing down extremists and advancing a moderate vision of change in Mississippi that centered on education. He died at 97 on December 18. 



  • Ted DeLaney, Conscience of a Roiled University, Dies at 77

    Ted DeLaney worked as a custodian at Washington and Lee before graduating at age 41,  returned as a professor, became the school's first Black department chair, and pushed the school to confront the moral and ethical implications of venerating Robert E. Lee. 



  • David Hackett, Historian and Holocaust Expert, Dies at 80

    Professor Hackett was noted for translating "The Buchenwald Report," made by German-speaking US military officers who described in detail their findings at the liberated concentration camp, preserving a key document for the fight against Holocaust denialism. He died of complications of the coronavirus. 



  • In Memoriam: Jenny Tone-Pah-Hote (1980–2020)

    by Malinda Maynor Lowery

    "Her contributions to historical scholarship, undergraduate teaching, and graduate mentorship will be remembered, and deeply missed, by all who knew her."



  • Stephen F. Cohen, Influential Historian of Russia, Dies at 81

    Stephen Cohen did not shy from controversy, either in his scholarly claims (made at the height of the Cold War) that the Bolshevik revolution contained true democratic potential before being corrupted, or in his criticisms of American efforts to influence post-Soviet Russia. 



  • How Not to Read Bernard Bailyn

    by Asheesh Kapur Siddique

    Conservatives lionizing Bernard Bailyn for supporting libertarian interpretations of the nation's founding and valorizing the founders "aligns perfectly with the reactionary effort to cancel critically engaged understandings of the American past, but poorly with Bailyn’s own far more nuanced vision of historical practice."