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  • Originally published 08/15/2013

    Clemson's Roger Grant receives book award

    CLEMSON — Clemson University history professor Roger Grant is the bronze winner of ForeWord Review’s Book of the Year Award for history. He won the accolade for his book "Railroads and the American People," a social history of the impact of railroads on American life, published in 2012 by Indiana University Press.“How the railroad has affected people has long intrigued me,” said Grant. “This book has allowed me the opportunity to explore that fascinating relationship.”The ForeWord Reviews’ Book of the Year Awards is judged by a select group of librarians and booksellers from around the country. There were 1,300 entries from more than 600 publishers and 248 winners were selected from 62 categories. Grant was the bronze winner in the genre of history....

  • Originally published 07/14/2013

    Michael Katz elected to American Philosophical Society

    Michael Katz has been elected to the American Philosophical Society.  He is the Walter H. Annenberg professor of history and a research associate at the Population Studies Center at the University of Pennsylvania. Election to the APS recognizes accomplishments in math and physical sciences, biological sciences, social sciences, humanities and the arts and various professions and recognizes leaders in public and private affairs....

  • Originally published 07/09/2013

    N.C. Museum of History Wins 2013 AASLH Award of Merit

    NASHVILLE, TN July 8, 2013 — The American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) proudly announces that the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh is the recipient of an Award of Merit from the AASLH Leadership in History Awards for the permanent exhibit History in Every Direction: Tar Heel Junior Historian Association Discovery Gallery. The AASLH Leadership in History Awards, now in its 68th year, is the most prestigious recognition for achievement in the preservation and interpretation of state and local history.The interactive exhibit History in Every Direction features hands-on activities related to exploring history through five kinds of primary sources: artifacts, documents, photographs, oral history, and buildings and sites. The exhibit also showcases award-winning projects by members of the Tar Heel Junior Historian Association, which is based at the N.C. Museum of History. THJHA’s many annual contests encourage students in grades four to 12 to discover and share the historical significance of people, places and events in their own communities. There are more than 5,000 Tar Heel junior historians in 47 counties across North Carolina....

  • Originally published 05/13/2013

    Michael Beschloss to receive Rutgers award

    NEW BRUNSWICK — The Rutgers Living History Society will present its 2013 Stephen E. Ambrose Oral History Award to presidential historian Michael Beschloss, familiar to millions of Americans for his many appearances on PBS’s “The News Hour.”The Rutgers Living History Society, comprised of participants in the Rutgers Oral History Archives program, will honor Beschloss at its annual meeting on Friday. Rutgers President Robert L. Barchi will present the award.“Oral history — the art of listening to people tell their own stories, and then making those stories available to others — is an essential tool of every practicing historian,” Beschloss said....

  • Originally published 04/18/2013

    Robert Caro wins $10,000 Mark Lynton History prize

    NEW YORK — Historian and author Robert Caro has won yet another award.Caro’s latest Lyndon Johnson book, “The Passage of Power,” has received the Mark Lynton History prize. Caro, whose many honors during the past 40 years have included the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award, will receive $10,000....

  • Originally published 04/17/2013

    Fredrik Logevall wins Pulitzer for history; Tom Reiss and Gilbert King win for biography and non-fiction

    Fredrik Logevall, John S. Knight Professor of International Studies at Cornell University, has won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for History for his book Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam, published by Random House last year.Embers of War, which the Washington Post called a "product of formidable international research ... lucidly and comprehensively composed," is a study of France's war in Vietnam, from the end of World War II to the eventual French withdrawal in 1954.Though the war was foughtly primarily between the French and their colonial auxiliaries on one side and the Viet Minh on the other, Logevall argues that the conflict was truly international in scope and American policymakers had great influence over French decisions from the very beginning. In particular, he maintains that Franklin D. Roosevelt, long an advocate of decolonization, would have pressured the French to exit Indochina in 1945, had he lived. But with Roosevelt's death and Harry Truman's de-emphasis on decolonialization and his policy of vehement anticommunism in Europe and Asia, the seeds were sown for a long, bloody conflict in Southeast Asia.

  • Originally published 03/26/2013

    Nominations Invited for the American Historical Association’s Equity Awards

    The American Historical Association seeks nominations for its Equity Awards, which recognize individuals and institutions that have demonstrated an exceptional record in recruiting and retaining students and new faculty from racial and ethnic groups underrepresented within the historical profession. Nominations are due by May 15....

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