;

refugees



  • Jewish Refugee Scholars at Black Colleges

    The work of European Jewish academics at Historically Black Colleges in the United States is an underrecognized part of both Black and Jewish American history; many prominent African Americans were students of refugee professors. 


  • Immigrant Families are the Second Casualty of War

    by Elliott Young

    If truth is the first casualty in war, immigrants follow as a close second. During the first and second world wars, tens of thousands of immigrants in the United States were locked up in prisons as part of a geopolitical game beyond their control.



  • Africa's Forgotten Refugee Convention

    by Marcia C. Schenck

    The Organization of African Unity proposed its own refugee convention in 1969, reframing the issue as one of solidarity rather than crisis, and pointing the way to a more humane and positive model of thinking about the problems of displacement and statelessness.



  • How the World Gave Up on the Stateless (Review)

    Over 10 million people are stateless today, and governments seem hell-bent on increasing their numbers. A new book examines how the rise of modern states created the dire circumstance of statelessness. 



  • Searching for Refuge After the Second World War

    New books by David Nasaw and Paul Betts examine the uncertain fate of Jewish Holocaust survivors in postwar Europe, the problem of massive human displacement, and the tension between interpreting Europe's refugee problem in universal terms or focusing on the specific consequences of anti-Jewish policies and prejudice. 



  • The History of Hmong Americans Explains why they Might Decide the Election

    by Melissa Borja

    Hmong refugees were resettled in the United States after participating as US allies in military operations in Laos. American policy of dispersing refugees in small groups away from coastal areas created Hmong communities in Wisconsin, Michigan and Minnesota. 


  • Fraught Family Reunification After the Holocaust

    by Rebecca Clifford

    "A tenth of Europe's pre-war population of Jewish children survived the Holocaust. Many sought and achieved reunification with their families, but reunification did not usually end the trauma endured by this "fragment of an entire generation."


  • Refugees in an Age of Immigration Restrictionism

    by Erik Christiansen

    Each new stage in the Trump administration’s handling of refugees and immigrants invites comparisons to past policies. Usually that means talking about the Obama years, or maybe the 1986 immigration reforms.  But it’s worth looking back further to the restrictionist era of the 1920s and 30s.