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Asian American History



  • The Muddled History of Anti-Asian Violence

    The COVID pandemic has led to increased hostility and violence targeting Asian Americans. Younger activists, who want to define these attacks as crimes of bias, struggle to convince the wider society that these individual incidents are part of a historical pattern of racism. 



  • Japanese Internment, Football, and a Legendary Team

    Dave Zirin's Edge of Sports podcast hosts Bradford Pearson, the author of "The Eagles of Heart Mountain," the story of a group of interned Japanese American teens whose football team dominated the state of Wyoming. 



  • Forgotten Camps, Living History: Japanese Internment in the South

    by Jason Christian

    Camp Livingston, deep in the Louisiana pines, used to be the site of a World War II Japanese internment camp. Drawing from the memories of internees, the research of two Louisiana State University librarians and other historians, and the activism of survivors and their descendants, this story uncovers a buried piece of American history.



  • Houston Hip-Hop and Chinese Chicken

    by Alana Dao

    The story of a restaurant run by Chinese immigrants in Houston is the story of the growth of the diverse Gulf coast metropolis and its fusion of ethnic cultures.



  • Corky Lee, Who Photographed Asian-American Life, Dies at 73

    Corky Lee viewed his camera as a weapon in the fight against stereotyping and discrimination against Asian Americans, and documented many important moments in the histories of Asian communities in New York and the US. 


  • Recognizing an Unrecognized Chinese American WWII Veteran

    by A.J. Wong

    In December, Congress honored all Chinese American World War II veterans with the Congressional Gold Medal, and some of their families will be eligible to receive a replica medal in their names. Hoy You Lim (林開祐) was killed in action in France in 1944. None of his survivors could complete the paperwork to receive his medal. The granddaughter of another Chinese American veteran wants to recognize his service. 



  • Patsy Takemoto Mink Blazed The Trail For Kamala Harris – Not Susan B. Anthony

    by Judy Tzu-Chun Wu

    Patsy Takemoto Mink, elected in 1972 as the first woman of color in Congress, deserves recognition as a pioneering advocate for gender equity and the rights of Americans Caribbean and Pacific territories, and for preparing a path for Kamala Harris's election as Vice President. 



  • The History of Hmong Americans Explains why they Might Decide the Election

    by Melissa Borja

    Hmong refugees were resettled in the United States after participating as US allies in military operations in Laos. American policy of dispersing refugees in small groups away from coastal areas created Hmong communities in Wisconsin, Michigan and Minnesota. 



  • A New History of Being Asian-American

    New Yorker critic Hua Hsu questions whether the PBS documentary series will simplify the experiences of Asian Americans through a lens of celebration that obscures ongoing conflict and prejudice.